Forbidden film lowering industry standard

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Forbidden film lowering industry standard

Cover art of recent Netflix film, ‘Maria.’

Cover art of recent Netflix film, ‘Maria.’

Photo provided by Netflix

Cover art of recent Netflix film, ‘Maria.’

Photo provided by Netflix

Photo provided by Netflix

Cover art of recent Netflix film, ‘Maria.’

Logan Brock, Writer

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The Netflix film ‘Maria,’ a Netflix original film that came out on Friday, says in summary, “An ex-assassin tries to leave her dark past behind until a power-hungry gang targets her and her family, forcing her to summon her killer instincts.” It is rated TV-MA for strong language and graphic violence.

I didn’t want to carry through with this review for any reason other than it being the worst B-movie I’ve ever suffered through, on top of having a mature audience rating. Thus, I’m not recommending that any other teens watch it.

I went into it with low expectations and an unbiased opinion. Other than seeing it being given a ⅗ stars by the Netflix review system. My expectations couldn’t possibly be lowered far enough to appreciate it whatsoever.

The first criteria for criticism is acting. The acting among the protagonists was at the B-level standard (nothing too special but not “bad”). However, the antagonist acting was sub par, to say the least.

The second criteria for criticism is writing. The storyline was nothing new or fresh, instead a standard action movie plot that is reskinned over and over again. As for dialog, there was a lot of clunky, goofy, and unnecessary dialog, as well as placement of profanity that hardly made sense.

The third criteria for criticism is choreography, this is a very key element that action movies must have down to a T. Fortunately, it wasn’t the worst I have ever witnessed, but some of the fight scenes were almost laughable. Some portions of the fights included very cheesy easy-break materials that made me genuinely laugh out loud.

The fourth criteria for criticism is camera work. This one allowed me to let out a sigh of relief because it might be the only not-terrible thing about the film. It certainly came far from impressing me, but it didn’t make me facepalm either.

The fifth and final criteria for criticism is effects. The gunshot effects, among many other bad sound effect, were another laughing stock, if the directors switched out the prop weaponry with Nerf guns, it would’ve been more believable. The visual effects, such as blood and lens flares, were absolutely atrocious.

The ⅗ stars that Netflix gave ‘Maria’ must’ve been favoritism for being a Netflix original (a film exclusively released to Netflix). My rating for this film would be set at a solid ⅕ stars, simply because the camera work didn’t put me into epileptic shock. I pity anyone that saw this movie before I released this review.