ASL’s importance in schools

American+Sign+Language+is+fairly+easy+to+learn%2C+and+can+help+develop+cognitive+abilities+in+adolescence.
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ASL’s importance in schools

American Sign Language is fairly easy to learn, and can help develop cognitive abilities in adolescence.

American Sign Language is fairly easy to learn, and can help develop cognitive abilities in adolescence.

photo provided by: www.jber.jb.mil

American Sign Language is fairly easy to learn, and can help develop cognitive abilities in adolescence.

photo provided by: www.jber.jb.mil

photo provided by: www.jber.jb.mil

American Sign Language is fairly easy to learn, and can help develop cognitive abilities in adolescence.

Sarah Liden, A&E and Social Media Editor

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Communication is the bane of human existence. Without it, our quality of life would greatly decrease. There would be no way to get any useful information across. You wouldn’t be able to hold a conversation, develop relationships or understand anyone speaking. Imagine not being able to communicate or not being able to communicate as well as the average person. This is an everyday struggle for the hearing impaired. I believe that American Sign Language (ASL) should be offered in  all schools across the country.

According to the U.S. National Library of Medicine, as of 2019, there are 1 million deaf people who use ASL as their first language in the United States. While you won’t be coming in contact with a hearing impaired person every day, ASL is a vital language to learn. If the idea of making a hearing impaired person’s life significantly easier doesn’t seem as important as other educational issues, think about it in an intellectual standpoint.

There are many social benefits from learning ASL. Studies conducted by Michigan State University have shown that children are able to associate signs with their spoken-English equivalent, helping them to speak faster. Children who learned sign language at a young age had higher IQs in comparison to children who didn’t learn sign language.

From a personal standpoint, I would’ve rather learned sign language than any other language offered at HHS. I find any second language to be useful, but sign language is just slipping under every able-bodied person’s radar.

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